Diabetes in Dogs

The symptoms of diabetes can develop very gradually, and include the following:

1. Increased urination. The first thing that often happens is blood sugar levels become so high outside the cells of your pet’s body that it spills into the urine, increasing urine production. You might notice your dog or cat is urinating more frequently or is having accidents in the house.



2. Increased thirst. Increased urination will in turn cause an increase in thirst, so you might also notice your pet emptying his water dish more often.

Increased thirst and urination are hallmarks of a diabetic condition, so those are things you’ll want to watch closely for, especially as your pet ages. Unfortunately, increased thirst and urine output are also signs of other serious health problems, so regardless of the age or condition of your dog or cat, you should make an appointment with your veterinarian if you notice these symptoms.



3. Increased appetite. Another symptom you might notice is increased appetite. Your pet will be hungrier because the amino acids needed inside the cells aren’t getting there, or aren’t being used appropriately.


4. Weight loss. When the cells of your pet’s body are being starved of essential nutrients, the result is often an increase in appetite.

But because the energy from food is not being used efficiently by the body’s cells, your pet can lose weight even though he’s taking in more calories.


5. Tiredness and lack of energy. Other symptoms you might notice in your pets’ are lethargy and lack of energy. When the cells of your pet’s body are deprived of blood sugar, he will often exhibit a general lack of desire to run, take a walk with you, or engage in play. Lack of activity and an increased need for sleep are typical in animals suffering from Type II diabetes.


6. Vision problems. Another symptom of diabetes in companion animals is blindness, which is seen primarily in dogs, but cats can also develop blindness as a result of diabetic cataracts.



7. Urinary tract infections. It’s not at all uncommon for diabetic dogs and cats to acquire secondary urinary tract infections. This happens because the more sugar there is in the urine, the greater the likelihood that bacteria will grow in your pet’s bladder.


8. Kidney failure. Kidney failure, especially in cats, is also a common secondary symptom of diabetes. Often the first diagnosis for a diabetic kitty is chronic renal insufficiency or acute kidney problems. The sugar that is meant to be retained in your pet’s bloodstream but spills over into the urine is very damaging to the kidneys.



At Holistic Pet Cuisine you can be sure that the diets we choose for your pets will benefit and keep them healthy throughout their lives.

http://www.holisticpetcuisine.com

http://www.holisticpetcuisineonline.com

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